He who creates re-creates himself

by T. Wignesan

for René Passeron*

You may not grow old too soon
if
Things you have known will come back to you again
No revision nor recall need put them back in place

Time was when you knew the time the place the face
Even the scarce women in prized moments gone in pain

Who would care nor what would it matter
in which life upon what water
you have trailed your fingers
upon waves of papers

Let your mind brush
some canvas in a rush
Left your mark
upon some bark
Wed some wanton women
spawned wholesome omens

Made as if the artier your words
held some moment in a perennial frame
Never to be banged away by fading suns
collapsing quasars
asteroid storms
puncturing galaxies
usurping black holes

Can this act of writing seize the moment
Or is it your way of saying

What else is there to be done?

Let the unknowable undermine the unknown

Here on this planet
we have made our sinuous conventions
stick to paper and canvas
stone and sound

And words that are haloed
by the sickness of the poet
though all is not lost for the pen
whose blood will
possess anchor expose

our futile justifications
explications
ratiocinations
doctoral dissertations

And generations will tremulously grant him
The right to unravel the eternities
For one who dared capture the moment
In the capsule of a poem

*René Passeron, b. 1920, a surrealist painter and philosopher, was the principal figure conducting research into “poietics” in France, since the eighties, after the renowned aesthetician Etienne Souriau took over from the internationally famous poet Paul Valéry who first mooted the project in 1939, though the Russians had already begun publishing in this field of research during the First World War. Professor Passeron led a twin career as a Senior Research Fellow with the premier European research organization: the French National Centre for Scientific Research (C.N.R.S.) and as a Professor at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales and at the University of Paris-I-Panthéon Sorbonne where he was the Director of the Institute of Aesthetics and Fine Arts.

T. Wignesan, Paris, April 12, 1987

| |  Share

<< first  < previous  [    ]  next >  last >>


About T. Wignesan

Biography
If I might be allowed to say so, I think my "first" love was poetry. Unfortunately for me, the British curricula at school did not put me in touch with the Metaphysical Poets, nor with the post-Georgian school. Almost all the school texts after World War II contained invariably Victorian narrative poems and some popular examples of Romantic poetry. I chanced upon a selection of T. S. Eliot's and Fitzgerald's Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, and a little later on Pope's An Essay on Man and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. That did the trick. Yet, I regret not having taken to prose in earnest earlier than the publication of my first collection: Tracks of a Tramp (1961). There's nothing like trying your hand at all kinds of prose exercises to come to grips with poetry. Or rather to see how poetry makes for the essence of speech/Speech and makes you realise how it can communicate what prose cannot easily convey. I have managed to put together several collections of poems, but never actually sought to find homes for them in magazines, periodicals or anthologies. Apart from the one published book, some of my sporadic efforts may be sampled at http://www.stateless.freehosting.net/menupage.htm